SLP Mission Statement

4th January 2015 at 3:07 pm

The University of Oregon Science Literacy Program (SLP) makes a real-world difference in the lives of UO students by building science literacy among undergraduate non-science majors, giving science students mentored teaching opportunities to implement active learning, and providing faculty with teaching professional development.

SLP offers General Education courses for non-science students that promote student-centered teaching and communication of science where non-science majors are empowered to consider scientific approaches to societal issues and have the opportunity to learn how to process and critique scientific information. Graduate students and undergraduate students in the sciences have mentored teaching opportunities where they learn the theory and practice of scientific teaching and effectively communicating ideas to audiences of non-scientists.  The program enables and assists faculty in improving teaching techniques using evidence-based pedagogy focusing on science literacy.


Professional Development Opportunities

11th March 2015 at 2:55 pm

Spring and Summer Professional Development Opportunities at the University of Oregon

We are excited to share a full slate of multi-day teaching professional development opportunities for faculty on the UO campus this spring and summer! These free events center on Science Communication, Active Learning, and Scientific Teaching and provide opportunities for faculty, post-doctoral fellows and graduate students at all stages of their careers to practice building new skills. Information about all four events and links to the applications are listed below. We hope you will read about the events and consider participating in these opportunities.

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Communicating Science Workshop Facilitated by the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University

When: May 14-15, 2015
Application due date: April 1, 2015
Target audience: UO faculty, post-doctoral fellows, and graduate students from all science disciplines

About the Workshop:
Public support for scientists and everyday applications of science would benefit from a more scientifically literate society. As scientists, you have an opportunity–an obligation, some might argue–to contribute to the public dialogue and understanding of science. Faculty from the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science have developed this workshop to provide training and communication tools to engage public, media, and classroom audiences.

More Information
Questions: ellyvan@uoregon.edu
Sponsors: Science Literacy Program, STEM CORE, and the College of Arts and Sciences.

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WORKING GROUP ON ACTIVE TEACHING AND LEARNING

When: June 17-19, 2015
Application due date: March 16, 2015
Target audience: UO Faculty from all disciplines

About the Working Group:
TEP invites individual applications for the second year of the popular, funded faculty group that will work to revise one of each member’s courses, enhancing their creativity, interactivity, rigor, and skill building in keeping with research on how people learn. In brief: research on teaching and learning indicates that active classes that ask students to grapple with authentic problems and questions, give prompt facilitative feedback, and align assignments and activities tightly and transparently with faculty goals have the potential to increase student learning. But how do we achieve this as individual faculty members—especially considering the particular strengths and challenges of our disciplines, classrooms, and students? The group seeks to provide an intriguing and supportive framework to help each participant find compelling answers to this question.

More Information
Questions: tep@uoregon.edu
Sponsors:
The group is hosted by the UO Libraries Center for Media and Educational Technology (CMET), the Yamada Language Center, and the Teaching Effectiveness Program (TEP). It is funded by Academic Affairs, the College of Arts and Sciences, and Division of Undergraduate Studies.

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UO MOBILE National Academies SUMMER INSTITUTE ON UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION

When: June 22-26, 2015
Application due date: April 30, 2015
Target Audience:
UO faculty, post-doctoral fellows, and graduate students from science and math disciplines (June 22-25) and UO administrators (June 26)

About the Institute:
The Mobile Summer Institute will provide an opportunity for UO discipline specific teams to explore scientific teaching and create activities to implement in their own courses. Administrators will have an opportunity to learn about the national context of science education reform. Over the past 10 years the summer institutes have trained more than 1,000 science educators in best practices in science teaching (Pfund et al. 2009). The goal of the Summer Institutes for Undergraduate Education is to transform education at colleges and universities by improving classroom education and attracting more diverse students to research. We undertake to train faculty and instructional staff in a scientific approach to teaching that reflects the way we work as researchers. Participants learn practical strategies for enhancing student learning. The institutes model the scientific teaching principles of active learning, assessment, and diversity, which are integrated into all aspects of the week’s schedule.

More Information
Questions: ellyvan@uoregon.edu
Sponsor: Science Literacy Program

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WEST COAST REGIONAL NATIONAL ACADEMIES SUMMER INSTITUTE ON UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION

When: July 13-18, 2015
Application due date: May 15, 2015
Target Audience:
Faculty, post-doctoral fellows, and graduate students from science and math disciplines across the West Coast. Priority will be given to UO participants.

About the Institute:
This evidence-based programs funded by HHMI is designed to support college science teachers in transforming undergraduate science education. Over the past 10 years the summer institutes have trained more than 1,000 science educators in best practices in science teaching (Pfund et al. 2009). In discipline specific teams, participants will develop a classroom activity to support student learning. The goal of the Summer Institutes for Undergraduate Education is to transform education at colleges and universities by improving classroom education and attracting more diverse students to research. We undertake to train faculty and instructional staff in a scientific approach to teaching that reflects the way we work as researchers. Participants learn practical strategies for enhancing student learning. The institutes model the scientific teaching principles of active learning, assessment, and diversity, which are integrated into all aspects of the week’s schedule.

More Information
Questions: ellyvan@uoregon.edu
Sponsor: HHMI and local host Science Literacy Program

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Journal Club Winter 2015 – Week 10

10th March 2015 at 2:49 pm

For Thursday, we will read two pieces to wrap up our assessment discussion this term.
Action Research, SoTL, DBER from University of Nebraska, Lincoln
http://www.unl.edu/dber/action-research-sotl-dber

McKinney, K. (2012). Making a difference: Application of SoTL to enhance learning. Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 12 (1), 1-7.
http://josotl.indiana.edu/article/download/1971/1935

For Friday, we will read an article from the most recent CBE Life Sciences journal.
Jensen, J. L., Kummer, T. A., & Godoy, P. D. D. M. (2015). Improvements from a Flipped Classroom May Simply Be the Fruits of Active Learning. CBE-Life Sciences Education14(1), ar5
http://www.lifescied.org/content/14/1/ar5.full.pdf+html

– Thursday 9:00am in LISB 317 facilitated by Julie Mueller, TEP and Elly Vandegrift, SLP
– Friday 12:00pm in LISB 317 facilitated by Elly Vandegrift, SLP

We look forward to seeing you there!
Julie and Elly


Journal Club Winter 2015 – Week 9

2nd March 2015 at 10:11 pm

For Thursday, we will explore how active learning can support creating an inclusive learning environment.

Eddy, S. L., & Hogan, K. A. (2014). Getting Under the Hood: How and for Whom Does Increasing Course Structure Work? Cell Biology Education, 13(3), 453–468. doi:10.1187/cbe.14-03-0050
http://www.lifescied.org/content/13/3/453.full.pdf+html

For Friday, we’ll read some practical strategies for increasing active learning.

Tanner, K. D. (2013). Structure matters: Twenty-one teaching strategies to promote student engagement and cultivate classroom equity. CBE Life Sciences Education,12(3), 322–331. doi:10.1187/cbe.13-06-0115
http://www.lifescied.org/content/12/3/322.full.pdf+html

– Thursday 9:00am in LISB 317 facilitated by Julie Mueller, TEP and Elly Vandegrift, SLP
– Friday 12:00pm in LISB 317 facilitated by Elly Vandegrift, SLP

We look forward to seeing you there!
Julie and Elly


SLP Course Featured in Oregon Quarterly

2nd March 2015 at 3:19 pm

The Spring 2015 issue of Oregon Quarterly features one of our Spring 2014 courses, Bread 101. This interdisciplinary course was team-taught by Judith Eisen, Karen Guillemin, Miriam Deutsch, Jennifer Burns Bright, and Elly Vandegrift and focused on the biology, chemistry, physics, history, culture, and politics of wheat and bread.

More information about SLP’s Bread 101 course is available on our website.