SLP Newsletter Spring 2014 – Week 11

In this week’s newsletter we have the following announcements:

1) End of year Science Literacy Program announcements
2) Win McLaughlin, past Graduate SLP Fellow, receives prestigious Fulbright Research Award for 2014-2015
3) CABS seminar covers tips for getting published and on improving effectiveness as a science communicator – Friday June 13 at 10am
4) Call for volunteers – Roosevelt Middle School needs volunteers to help with end of year physics projects on Friday, June 13
5) SPICE Camp call for volunteers – Information meeting June 12 and June 18, 2014
6) What Works: Important Questions for Technologies and Pedagogies in 21st Century Learning Commons – Webinar Monday, June 23 at 12:15
7) Call for volunteers – North Eugene High School seeks volunteers to assist with robotics club


1) End of year Science Literacy Program announcements

As our spring term comes to a close this week, we want to thank you for a great year discussing science education through the Science Literacy Teaching Journal Club. We are already talking about how we would like to organize the journal club for next year. While we have already received feedback from our Spring 2014 Journal Club participants, we would love to hear from others as well. If you have any suggestions on topics please send the Science Literacy Program an email.

We hope that you are ready to dive into summer! There were so many wonderful conversations about teaching started during the academic year, and we would like to continue them into the summer. We will have a few informal Teaching Conversations coffee gatherings over the summer and will send announcements to this list. We look forward to starting our Science Literacy Teaching Journal Club back up in the fall term.

Please continue to send us any announcements you would like distributed to the SLP group.

Back to Top


2) Win McLaughlin, past Graduate SLP Fellow, receives prestigious Fulbright Research Award for 2014-2015

Win McLaughlin, a doctoral student in Geological Sciences, will be traveling to Kyrgyzstan under a Fulbright Research Award. While there, Win be using biostratigraphy to determine the age of the many active geological faults in the country.  “Kyrgyzstan is the single most seismically active, or earthquake prone, country in the entire world,” McLaughlin explains.

Last month Win won the University of Oregon Three Minute Thesis Competition. In her talk, “Earthquakes, Climate Change, and Fossils… Oh My!”, she explains that the process of identifying the age of an earthquake typically involves radiometric dating of volcanic ash. Central Asia, however, does not have any volcanoes. This is where biostratigraphy comes in. Win will work to identify fossils within sedimentary rock strata by comparing them to known fossils from China, Mongolia, and Pakistan. This will provide an age for the fossils and thereby determine the relative geologic age of the rock around the samples. The age of the rocks in the fault area, coupled with the level of earthquake for that fault, will help assess the risk posed by the fault. This information will help construct hazard maps for the country.

Win McLaughlin is a two-time Graduate SLP Fellowship recipient. She worked on the courses PHYS 156M – Scientific Revolutions in Fall 2013 and on GEOL 110 – People, Rocks, and Fire: How Societies Navigate Energy Transitions in Spring 2013.

Back to Top


3) CABS seminar covers tips for getting published and on improving effectiveness as a science communicator – Friday June 13 at 10am

Dr. Sandra Aamodt, former chief editor at Nature Neuroscience, will lead an interactive discussion on how to get published in a high-profile journals and how improve your own effectiveness as a science communicator. The seminar is co-hosted by UO Women in Graduate Science and Career Advancement in Biological Sciences.

Aamodt has published several books, including “Welcome to Your Brain: Why You Lose Your Keys but Never Forget How to Drive and Other Puzzles of Everyday Life.” She also tackled “Why Dieting Doesn’t Usually Work” in a TED Talk in 2013.

Date: Friday June 13, 2014
Time: 10:00 – 11:00
Location: Lewis Integrative Science Building Room 317

Back to Top


4) Call for volunteers – Roosevelt Middle School needs volunteers to help with end of year physics projects on Friday, June 13

Chad Heidtke at Roosevelt Middle School is looking for some volunteers to help out with his 7th & 8th grade student’s final projects.

Glider Project Description: 
The goal of the glider project is to help students learn about the physics of flight, fluid dynamics, and Newton’s Laws. For the past trimester student teams have designed and tested gliders made from only two foam plates and three straws. On Friday, June 13, 7th and 8th grade students will present their finished projects.

Volunteers are needed to check view the students’ work and assess their understanding of the science concepts. A rubric will be provided.

Date: Friday, June 13th
Times: 11:00-12:00 & 1:20-2:20
Location: Roosevelt Middle School 680 E 24th Ave, Eugene, OR 97405
Contact: Chad Heidtke by email (click on his name) or leave a message for him at 541-515-1588

Back to Top


5) SPICE Camp call for volunteers – Information meeting June 12 and June 18, 2014

SPICE will be holding two informational meetings for those interested in volunteering for the SPICE science summer camps which are held July 8th-18th. SPICE can use a lot of help from set up to leading fun science activities. If you love science and want to encourage young girls to pursue science education and careers, this is the volunteer opportunity for you.

SPICE will hold two brief informational meetings about volunteering for SPICE camp. The meeting will be followed by an introduction to the program philosophy.

  • Thursday, June 12th – 1pm – 240D Willamette Hall
  • Wednesday, June 18th – 11am – 240D Willamette Hall

Contact Brandy Todd at the Oregon Center for Optics  (541) 346-4313 with any questions.

If you know for certain that you want to volunteer, you can jumpstart the process by filling out the SPICE camp volunteer information survey.

Camp Descriptions:
More than Meets the Eye: Science Discovery Camp
Rising 6th Graders
Learn about physics, chemistry and biology while exploring the UO campus. Explore ballistics on our live “Angry Avian’s” projectile range, make bubbles with super cold fluids, and make your own hot air balloons. Then take everything that you’ve learned and apply it to the amazing science race at the end of camp.

Science Mystery: Forensic Investigation
Rising 7th Graders
Make your own footprint casts and bit impressions. Learn how to interrogate witnesses. Dig up mysterious fossils. Then work with your team to uncover the mystery at the end of camp. Deduce who the culprit is and arrest your suspect at the final presentation!

Engineering Made Fun: Physics and Computer Science
Rising 8th Graders
Learn how to program using Arduino Uno boards. Build devices with your own hands and put them all together to make a working pinball machine. Campers will have the opportunity to present their creations at the Lane County Fair in July!

Back to Top


6) What Works: Important Questions for Technologies and Pedagogies in 21st Century Learning Commons – Webinar Monday, June 23 at 12:15

Are you interested in how to meld design of learning spaces with active learning teaching philosophies? Join the UO community viewing of the upcoming webinar “What Works: Important Questions for Technologies and Pedagogies in 21st Century Learning Commons” presented by the Learning Spaces Collaboratory.

Webinar description:
The designers of our active learning spaces are often not the people who teach or learn in them. Well-intended technology and design choices pay off in some cases and sit dusty in others. An intentional approach to design is needed that takes into account both specialized uses of the space and generic uses, especially for informal learning spaces. After an analysis of some learning spaces planning issues, we will look at a series of concrete examples at the University of Pennsylvania of gadgets, software-based and furniture-based technologies. For each, we will ask – why did we choose to implement them? How did we use them? Did they work as expected? How did our usage choices inform the next moment of decision-making? In the spirit of appreciative inquiry and building on the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) literature, we will abstract out some ideas for extrapolation.

Facilitators:
Joan K. Lippincott, Associate Executive Director – Coalition for Networked Information
Anu Vedantham, Director, Weigle Information Commons – University of Pennsylvania Libraries

Date: Monday, June 23, 2014
Time: 12:15-2:00
Location: Knight Library, Room 41 Lower Level

  • 12:15-12:30 – A “silent” PPT will set the stage for the webinar
  • 12:30-1:30 – Facilitators will explore the above questions
  • 1:30-2:00 – Participant question and answer period

Back to Top


7) Call for volunteers – North Eugene High School seeks volunteers to assist with robotics club

Anthony Harlan, a math teacher at North Eugene High School and veteran SPICE instructor, is organizing a robotics club for his students. He’s looking for experts to volunteer and share their technical knowledge.

If you have questions or want to volunteer, please contact Anthony directly.

Back to Top