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NEWSLETTER
SPRING 2016- WEEK 3

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OUR MISSION IS TO SUPPORT STUDENT SUCCESS THROUGH DEVELOPMENT OF EXCELLENT SCIENCE TEACHERS.

Journal Club

This week in journal club we will have a guest visit from Karen Matson and Pat Fellows, Instructional Technologists and Designers with CMET.  They will talk with us about how to use Canvas to enhance student learning, including showing us some features of Canvas you might not know about.  There is no official reading assignment to prepare for journal club this week, but you can find out about some interesting features Karen and Pat may not get to by visiting https://www.canvaslms.com/higher-education/features. It may be useful to bring a computer or tablet with you to access Canvas during journal club.

For your convenience, we will continue to offer two weekly meetings in 317 LISB (Lewis Integrated Sciences Building):

Thursdays at 9:00 am
Fridays at 12:00 pm

Hope to see you there.

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Public Speaking and Three Minute Thesis Candidates

Want to learn how to stand up and convey ideas with passion? Whether you are a GTF or participating in the Three Minute Thesis, this workshop  will walk you through proven strategies that even the most nervous speaker can use to give off-the-cuff talks like a seasoned pro. George Hecht of Campus Operations and John Schmor, Associate Professor of Theatre Arts will offer public speaking tips, how to deal with speech anxiety, and tools for being a dynamic speaker. This workshop is open to all graduate students with an interest in fine tuning their public speaking skills, particularly students participating in the upcoming Three Minute Thesis! More information can be found on the calendar and please RSVP using this link.

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Biology Scholars Teaching with Data: Course-Based Undergraduate Research

This program will focus on helping participants implement Course-based Undergraduate Research Experiences (CUREs) either based on their own research or by adapting an existing project. CUREs are recognized as an effective approach for teaching content and the process of science as well as recruiting and retaining students in STEM. Participants will work with mentors who have successfully implemented CUREs and other cohort members to share resources, provide feedback and brainstorm new ideas as they develop and implement CURE approaches using data. The program is on June 15-16, 2016, in Boston, Massachusetts. The application deadline is April 11. Learn more about the program and apply using this link.

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Neil deGrasse Tyson: An Astrophysicist goes to the Movies 

Neil deGrasse Tyson is the recipient of nineteen honorary doctorates and the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal, the highest award given by NASA to a non-government citizen. From writing best-sellers to advising NASA, hosting TV and radio hits and inspiring people to love science, Tyson has lived a life that most of us can only dream about. Come be inspired by his stories in his Eugene debut on Thursday, June 16, at 7:30 pm at the Hult Center.

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Physics Colloquium Talk on Gravitational Waves 

On September 14, 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) simultaneously observed a transient gravitational-wave signal due to the inspiral and merger of a binary black hole system at a distance of more than one billion light-years. The signal was very clearly detected, allowing the LIGO collaboration to claim the first direct detection of gravitational waves, the ripples in spacetime predicted 100 years ago by Einstein.

This was also the first indication that black holes in this range of mass — about 30 times the mass of the sun – exist in nature. In this talk, Raymond Frey will discuss how the detection was made, the tests of Einstein’s theory of general relativity, the implications for astrophysics, and the future of gravitational-wave astronomy. The talk will be held from 4:00 – 5:00 pm on Thursday, April 14, in 100 WIL.

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UO 2016 Mobile Summer Institute

The Science Literacy Program invites you to attend a Mobile Summer Institute on Scientific Teaching August 8-11, 2016 at the University of Oregon. The Summer Institute will expand and sharpen participants teaching skills through workshops facilitated by national science education experts.  Participants will develop original, innovative classroom materials ready for immediate implementation and will be named 2016-17 National Academies Education Fellows at the end of the institute. A post-meeting UO STEM strategic planning session will be held on August 12, 2016. Application due date: June 3, 2016. Questions and nominations: ellyvan@uoregon.edu

In the words of a previous participant, “I’m pretty confident in my abilities to give a good lecture and run a well-organized course, and I get good ratings from students. But I could tell that many students weren’t really learning the material in any depth. I’d heard the compelling evidence that swapping out lecture time for in-class problem-solving was the way to go, but of course I was worried about how much extra work that would be for me, and I wasn’t really sure what class time would look like. The Summer Institute was exactly what I needed – practical advice on how to make this change, including what works and what doesn’t. The good news is that even the best students have been shown to do better with this style of teaching. I switched out about a third of my lecture time in each of my courses this year, and I was very pleased with how engaged students seemed to be and by how stimulating and fun it was for me too. I plan to make a full switch next year. I highly recommend the Summer Institute – it’s an easy way to jumpstart the process of improving your teaching.”
- Tory Herman, Associate Professor Biology, 2015-16 National Academies Education Fellow

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In This Issue:

Journal Club

Public Speaking and Three-Minute Thesis Candidates

Biology Scholars Teaching with Data: Course-based Undergraduate Research

Neil deGrasse Tyson: An Astrophysicist goes to the Movies

Physics Colloquium Talk on Gravitational Waves 

UO 2016 Mobile Summer Institute

Upcoming UO and Local Events


Upcoming UO and Local Events:

Science Outreach Training Workshops

All workshops are free and open to anyone who is interested. All workshops will be held in Willamette 240D.

Safety in Science Demonstrations
Light things on fire. Go sub-zero in this hands-on workshop covering all of our favorite dangerous and exciting demonstrations. Learn how to safely handle fire and cryogenic substances in public settings.

When: Friday, Apr. 15, 1:00-3:00 pm

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Sky Studio Teaching Conversations

Mondays 1:00-2:00pm
Knight Library Conference Room 410
TEP welcomes you to register for its Sky Studio Teaching Conversations. These informal small-group conversations and hands-on sessions (capped at 10) give faculty and GTFs a chance to dive more deeply into specific teaching issues.

Week 3: Mon, Apr. 11
When to Grade: We’ll learn about formative assessment techniques and discuss how feedback can drive student learning.

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TEP: Developing an Online Teaching Portfolio

Week 3: Thur, Apr. 14
10:00am-noon, 72 PLC

A teaching portfolio presents evidence of your teaching activities and accomplishments and links them to your overarching teaching philosophy. It is an opportunity to document, share, and reflect on your teaching and to prepare materials that may be useful for job applications, promotion and tenure review, and TEP’s Graduate Teaching Initiative. This workshop will provide an overview of how to develop and maintain an online teaching portfolio using the UO Blogs platform.

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TEP: Engaging Student Resistance

Week 3: Fri, Apr. 15
11:00am-12:30pm
Proctor 41, Knight Library

Back by popular demand!
Despite your best efforts to motivate and engage students, do you find that “the resistance” is alive and well in your class? In this workshop we will discuss sources of student resistance to learning and strategies for more fully inviting students into the key work of the course. We’ll focus on student resistance to course content, especially material that raises issues of power, privilege, and difference. We’ll also address students’ reluctance to engage in particular teaching and learning methods.

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TEP: Advanced Strategies for Discussion Leaders: Difficult Dialogues

Week 4: Fri, Apr. 22
10:00am-12:00pm
Knight Library Browsing Room

This interactive workshop seeks to help faculty and GTFs create course learning communities that are capable of seriously addressing complex issues together—including race, gender, privilege, and culture. We will share strategies for developing respect and mutuality in the classroom; we’ll also consider structures that enable students to better discuss sensitive course material. With the help of Rehearsals for Life, we’ll practice negotiating heated or potentially painful or offensive moments in the classroom using scenarios developed from experiences of UO faculty and GTFs.

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541.346.8982
scilit@uoregon.edu
http://scilit.uoregon.edu/

UO Science Literacy Program
1210 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403