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NEWSLETTER
SPRING 2016- WEEK 7

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OUR MISSION IS TO SUPPORT STUDENT SUCCESS THROUGH DEVELOPMENT OF EXCELLENT SCIENCE TEACHERS.

Journal Club

To support improved science communication, the University of Oregon has been an affiliate of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science since 2015.  This week, visit the Alda Center website to see what resources are available http://www.centerforcommunicatingscience.org/.  Write down three ideas that you found from the website that you can use in your own science communications.

For your convenience, we will continue to offer two weekly meetings in 317 LISB (Lewis Integrated Sciences Building):

Thursdays at 9:00 am
Fridays at 12:00 pm

Hope to see you there.

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Fall 2016 Scholars and Fellows

We are now recruiting undergraduate SLP scholars and graduate fellows. Review of applications will begin May 23, 2016. Here’s the link to the undergraduate application, CAS 409 Practicum information, and the graduate application.

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UO 2016 Mobile Summer Institute

The Science Literacy Program invites you to attend a Mobile Summer Institute on Scientific Teaching August 8-11, 2016 at the University of Oregon. The Summer Institute will expand and sharpen participants teaching skills through workshops facilitated by national science education experts.  Participants will develop original, innovative classroom materials ready for immediate implementation and will be named 2016-17 National Academies Education Fellows at the end of the institute. A post-meeting UO STEM strategic planning session will be held on August 12, 2016. Application due date: June 3, 2016. Questions and nominations: ellyvan@uoregon.edu

In the words of a previous participant, “I’m pretty confident in my abilities to give a good lecture and run a well-organized course, and I get good ratings from students. But I could tell that many students weren’t really learning the material in any depth. I’d heard the compelling evidence that swapping out lecture time for in-class problem-solving was the way to go, but of course I was worried about how much extra work that would be for me, and I wasn’t really sure what class time would look like. The Summer Institute was exactly what I needed – practical advice on how to make this change, including what works and what doesn’t. The good news is that even the best students have been shown to do better with this style of teaching. I switched out about a third of my lecture time in each of my courses this year, and I was very pleased with how engaged students seemed to be and by how stimulating and fun it was for me too. I plan to make a full switch next year. I highly recommend the Summer Institute – it’s an easy way to jumpstart the process of improving your teaching.”
- Tory Herman, Associate Professor Biology, 2015-16 National Academies Education Fellow


Three Minute Thesis Competition

The UO Graduate School is holding its fourth “Three Minute Thesis” competition on Friday, May 13. Graduate students have just three minutes (and one static Powerpoint slide) to talk about their research. The winners get cash prizes and a chance to compete at the state competition, which will be held in Corvallis on May 21 against OHSU, OSU, and PSU students. The audience gets a whole lot of fast-paced and engagingly delivered research! Preliminary rounds are 1:30-3:00 in Lillis 112 and 185. Those who survive the preliminary rounds will move on to the finals (after a break for cookies), which will run from 4:00-5:30 in Lillis 182. All are welcome to attend!

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The Jacobi-Legendre Correspondence: A Vignette in the History of Mathematics

Once upon a time, a recent math PhD (in Germany) got up the courage to write to one of the world’s greatest mathematicians (in France) about the problems he was working on regarding elliptic functions. The Master wrote back a few days later at length and with much praise for the youngster’s work. Thus began the correspondence between Carl Gustav Jacob von Jacobi (the youngster) and Adrien-Marie Legendre (the Master). The correspondence is filled with lessons about the process of mathematical discovery, about how mathematicians inspire and compete with each other, as well as wonderful math. This lecture – largely a talk in the history of math – will tour highlights in the Jacobi-Legendre correspondence, famous for richness in mathematical gems. Naturally, the ulterior motive is to introduce the audience to elliptic functions and other mathematical objects that fascinated Jacobi and Legendre.

Farshid Hajir from the University of Massachusetts Amherst will be presenting this lecture Tuesday, May 10, from 5:15-6:15 pm in Straub 145.

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RIT’s Future Faculty Career Exploration Program

The Future Faculty Career Exploration Program (FFCEP) is an innovative diversity program designed to fuel the future pipeline of faculty to RIT. The annual FFCEP is an all-expense-paid opportunity for minority scholars nearing the end of their doctoral studies, MFA studies, and postdoctoral assignments, as well as interested junior level faculty, to come to Rochester and experience life as an RIT faculty member. Faculty members and deans engage prospects in discussions about their academic work and career interests. Participants learn about the campus culture from current students and faculty, and meet with administration to understand the core values of the institution. The application deadline is May 16, 2016, and more information about the application can be foundhere.

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Teaching Public Crisis and Controversy

How do we engage with sudden public crises and controversies in the classroom? What about slower, more “invisible” ones? Can we use our classrooms to create occasions for student learning and productive academic work around urgent issues? Join a panel of experienced UO faculty and GTFs who will share specific teaching strategies for bringing challenging moments and materials into the classroom. Together we’ll explore how to frame crisis and controversy as moments of classroom reflection and inquiry, build supported space for student explorations of their own and others’ reactions, facilitate productive conversations in fraught territory, and cultivate more empowering attitudes and skills for effective responses to difficult issues. Register here for this event.

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In This Issue:

Journal Club

Fall 2016 Scholars and Fellows

UO 2016 Mobile Summer Institute

Three Minute Thesis Competition

The Jacobi-Legendre Correspondence: A Vignette in the History of Mathematics

RIT’s Future Faculty Career Exploration Program

Teaching Public Crisis and Controversy

Upcoming UO and Local Events


Upcoming UO and Local Events:

Science Outreach Club Events

SPICE Summer Camp Volunteer Instructors

We’re pleased to announce the introduction of a 4th SPICE Summer program entitled Combustion Camp for our oldest campers! Do you like to burn, combust, or implode? This is the camp for you to volunteer with! Learn more here at our instructor page!

Arduino Workshops (free)

May and June
Learn how to program with Arduino! The project you will be working on is programing and setting up all the electronic components for a fully functional pinball table similar to the one linked hereSample lessons from last year can be found here.  Email Brandy if you are interested in attending these trainings. Trainings will take place during evenings in May and June. Times will be set once we have a group of volunteers. No past experience required!

Girls Science Adventure

May 149:30 am -12:30 pm
Teach a group of 20 girls ages 10-12 all about electronics through a series of simple circuit activities culminating in scribble bots.

ATA STEM Field Trip

May 25th & 26th, ~10am-2pm**
Lead “Fun with Fractals,” a hands-on exploration of some of the coolest mathematics activities including the Fractal Dragon, Infinite Snow Flakes, and Snake-Snake-Snake. This workshop will be presented 3 times each day (a total of 6 workshops). **This is a paid instructor opportunity

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Be Aware

May 10, 7:00-8:30 pm
Straub 156

What does it mean to be white? Dr. Robin DiAngelo will discuss what “white” means in regard to race and socialization in our country. She’ll raise awareness of common barriers while helping us develop the skills and motivation to bridge racial divides in our academic, personal, and professional worlds. BE there and BE aware.

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SPICE Camp 2016 Scholarship Campaign

This campaign will provide scholarships for girls to attend the SPICE science summer camps! 40% of our campers need financial assistance with camp tuition. We’ve set the goal of raising $5,000 in thirty days. If we reach this goal we will be able to provide partial support to all girls who need it to attend camp. A $25 donation will give one girl almost 5 hours of amazing hands-on science! If you are interested in donating, please follow this link.

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Canvas Faculty Panel

UO Libraries’ Center for Media and Educational Technologies is hosting a panel and discussion on Canvas. Panelists include:
Sierra Dawson (Human Physiology), Erik Ford (Lundquist College of Business), Sung Park (School of Journalism and Communication, and Mike Urbancic (Economics). This panel will be held on Friday, May 13, 1:00-3:00pm, in
Knight Library 267-B.

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Be Aware: Continuing Conversations

May 11, 12:00 pm
EDU 119

Dr. Johnny Lake will listen to your questions, concerns, and comments on Dr. Robin DiAngelo’s lecture. All students are welcome to join in this casual setting to continue these important conversations – snacks provided. Be heard, hear others, and ask questions.

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541.346.8982
scilit@uoregon.edu
http://scilit.uoregon.edu/

UO Science Literacy Program
1210 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403