Promoting Student Success through Evidence-Based Science Education
In This Edition

SLP Opportunities and Journal Club
Journal Club

Do you have goals for your students that go beyond learning the scientific content of your course?  Maybe you want them to develop skills that will enable them to learn on their own after the course is finished.  Or you want them to get better at working in groups.  Or you just want them to appreciate how cool your subject is!  How can you make sure all these goals come through in your course?  This week in Journal Club we will begin our investigation of “Your Course from the Ground Up” by considering L. Dee Fink’s approach to creating significant learning experiences, which includes paying attention to some of these less tangible goals in addition to disciplinary content goals.  To prepare, please read:

Chapter 2: A Taxonomy of Significant Learning in Fink, L.D. 2013. Creating Significant Learning Experiences: An Integrated Approach to Designing College Courses. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco.

The book is available as an e-book from the UO Library.

We look forward to seeing you on Thursday!
Julie and Austin


Lab Lit Book ClubJoin us at our next meeting on Wednesday May 9th, at 7 pm, in Room B042 of the Science Library, when we will discuss T. C. Boyle’s When the Killing’s Done.

When the Killing’s Done is the story of Alma Boyd Takesue, a conservation biologist with the National Park Service, who organizes an effort to remove invasive species from the Channel Islands of California. But her work is vigorously opposed by an activist group, For the Protection of Animals, which objects to the killing of animals under all circumstances.

Our meetings are open to everyone, and no RSVP is required. Just read the book and come prepared to discuss it.

For more information, contact Rachel Rodman or Phil Lotshaw. Happy reading, and we’ll see you May 9th!


Conferences and Events
See a conference you would like to attend? Contact the Science Literacy Program to see if travel funds are available!


2018 Summer Institute on Scientific TeachingRegional Summer Institutes 

June 18-22: California – University of California, San Diego
July 9-13: Northwest – The Evergreen State College
July 16-20: Gulf Coast – Louisiana State University
July 22-26: Northeast – University of Connecticut

Mobile Summer Institutes 

September 10-14, 2018: University of Oregon, Oregon
For more information, visit our website.


SABER Registration and Call for Abstracts

Registration for the 2018 National Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research meeting is now open. Remember meeting starts at  1pm on Friday and runs until 5pm on Sunday June 27-29.  Workshops will be held Friday morning from 8:30-12:30. Early bird registration for meeting is until June 17, block of rooms at hotel is available until June 26th or block is sold out, whichever comes first. Don’t forget that abstracts are due April 9thFor more information, and to register, please visit our website.


Updates on the NSEC 2018 National Conference

We sent notifications on Friday, March 23 to everyone who submitted a Roundtable, Concurrent Session, Panel, or Workshop proposal for the Network of STEM Education Centers workshop. If you did not hear from us, email kredd@aplu.org. If you submitted a Poster abstract, we will be following up with you after April 30 to confirm the title and abstract. Deadline for Posters and Rapid Talks is April 30. There is still time to submit a Poster or Rapid Talk, which are due April 30. Submit here: https://serc.carleton.edu/StemEdCenters/NSEC2018/app_proposal.html. As a reminder, Rapid Talks are 5-minute presentations during a plenary session. If you have a program or practice that is leading to success for your center or institution, this is your chance to share that practice with other center directors.

Pre-work for the Communications Professional Development is due April 30

We strongly encourage anyone who plans to attend the conference to complete a quick homework assignment. We are asking you to upload either a 1-page communication document that your center uses to talk about its work or a short essay about how your center communicates its mission and vision to stakeholders, partners, and funders. We will use this information to develop the professional development sessions of the conference. Your feedback is critical. You can share your expertise here: https://serc.carleton.edu/StemEdCenters/workshop2018/pre-meeting.html

Early Bird Registration ends April 3

Register by April 3 for the NSEC 2018 National Conference: https://www.cvent.com/events/nsec-2018-national-conference/registration-425045c01dff400c95df2e7d3c5ef7e2.aspx?fqp=true.


UO and Local Events and Announcements
Ideas on Tap: The Microbiology of Bread

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History presents Ideas on Tap, Wednesday April 4 at Sprout! Regional Food Hub. Enjoy Claim 52 craft beers and thought-provoking discussions about science, culture, and more, starting at 6:00pm. Bread is a food staple across many cultures. It’s also a living entity teeming with microbial cultures. In this talk, UO ‘Bread 101′ instructor Karen Guillemin will explore how microbes shape the production—and consumption—of bread. Cosponsored by Claim 52 AbbeyLa Granada Latin KitchenPig & Turnip, and 100 Mile Bakery. Learn more at natural-history.uoregon.edu.


Women in Graduate Sciences- Science Slam 

The Women in Graduate Sciences are looking for speakers for Science Slam 2018, April 19 from 6:00-9:00pm. Anyone is welcome to give a 5 minute talk or presentation for a general audience; grad students and postdocs are highly encouraged to apply. The application deadline is Friday, April 6 by 3:00pm. The event is hosted by the University of Oregon Women in Graduate Science and sponsored by the UO Museum of Natural and Cultural History. For more information and to apply, visit our website.


Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Corner
Do you give multiple choice exams? Careful design can make those exams better measures of student understanding, and even turn them into tools that foster learning.  Find ideas and references in this short review on optimizing multiple-choice assessments: Xu, X., Kauer, S., & Tupy, S. (2016). Multiple-choice questions: Tips for optimizing assessment in-seat and online. Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Psychology2(2), 147.


Job and Graduate School Opportunities
  1. Assistant Professor in Chemistry Education- National Institute of Education in Singapore
  2. Associate Director- Center for Science and Math in Context (COSMIC)
541.346.8982                                                                                             UO Science Literacy Program
scilit@uoregon.edu                                                                                             1210 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403
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