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NEWSLETTER
WINTER 2016- WEEK 4

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OUR MISSION IS TO SUPPORT STUDENT SUCCESS THROUGH DEVELOPMENT OF EXCELLENT SCIENCE TEACHERS.

Journal Club

For this week, please read Chapter 4 “Embrace Difficulties” of Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning.

Brown, P. C., Roediger, H. L., & McDaniel, M. A. (2014). Make it stick: the science of successful learning. Harvard University Press.

For your convenience, we will continue to offer two weekly meetings:

Thursdays at 9:00 am (317 LISB)
Fridays at 1:00 pm (317 LISB)

Elly and Julie

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Science Friday at UO

A crew from Science Friday spent a couple of days visiting the UO’s Energy Studies in Buildings Laboratories and the Biology and the Built Environment Center and interviewing key faculty members. They talked about recent UO research into the human “microbial cloud” that surrounds individuals with a unique mix of microorganisms; the microbial populations found inside homes, offices and other buildings; and reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant pathogens in dust. The first of those programs will air Jan. 29 at 2 p.m. on Portland station KOPB at 550 AM and 1600 AM in Eugene or at 11 a.m. online atsciencefriday.com. An air date for the second segment has not been set. Read the full article at:http://around.uoregon.edu/content/science-friday-chases-bugs-look-uo-research

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Flame Challenge

The deadline has been extended to Tuesday, Jan 26, 2016 to submit your entry.

The challenge is to explain “What is Sound” to 11-year-olds. Entries can be written or visual and are judged by thousands of 5th and 6th graders from around the world. Winners are honored at the World Science Festival in June where they will meet Alan Alda and get a $1000 prize. Scientists can enter at http://bit.ly/1MtC6Sk.

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Teaching Workshops with Joan Middendorf 

On February 8-9, the Division of Equity and Inclusion will host Dr. Joan Middendorf, the Director of the Faculty Learning Community at Indiana University for a series of four teaching workshops for faculty and administrators.

1. Faculty Workshop: Managing Hot Moments in the Classroom

Many instructors avoid controversial issues in the classroom because of the difficulty involved in managing heated discussions. Instructors who are willing to bring up such issues may face disheartening challenges in the classroom or low student ratings, in part, because of their identity‹their race, gender, accent, etc. Controversy can be a useful, powerful, and memorable tool to promote learning. Research has demonstrated that conflict or controversy during classroom discussion can promote cognitive gains in complex reasoning, integrated thinking, and decision-making. In this session we will discuss how instructors can successfully manage discussions on controversial topics. Participants will consider problematic scenarios and discuss approaches to avoid problems.

ED 176, Monday, February 8, 2:00pm 3:30pm
RSVP: space is limited. RSVP by Wednesday, January 27 at noon: http://tinyurl.com/j2fl66x

2. Faculty Workshop: Transformational Teaching and Learning

The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning has created a shift in higher education through evidence-based teaching. We can approach teaching not only from content or methods, but from a feedback loop established between teachers and learners. Working in cross-disciplinary groups we will examine evidence of student learning‹like x-rays of student understanding. We will consider the most essential learning in our fields and the places students tend to get stuck so that our students are not only more likely to learn to, but also gain an understanding of the underlying ways of operating in our disciplines. When we have a methodology at our disposal that produces real change our relationship to teaching is transformed.

Ford Alumni Center Board Room (4th floor), Monday, February 8, 10:00am 11:30am
RSVP by Wednesday, January 27 at noon:http://tinyurl.com/z7b8epz

4. Deans and Heads of Departments Workshop: Evaluating Teaching: Best Practices OR Research on Evaluation of Teaching

While student ratings can provide helpful and legitimate feedback, all things being equal, an instructor who teaches a challenging course will score lower than an instructor whose course is less rigorous. Research has shown implicit bias in student ratings. While student ratings are very good for measuring customer satisfaction, under the best of circumstances, there¹s only a mild correlation between student learning and an instructor¹s rating. Dr. Middendorf will explain the shift towards other tests and learning assessments that can serve as evidence of student learning to document teaching effectiveness along with student ratings. Learning assessments are not only are useful in the evaluation of teaching but are an important element in program review.

Ford Alumni Center Ballroom, Tuesday, February 9, 2:00pm 3:30pm
RSVP: space is limited. RSVP by Wednesday, January 27 at noon: http://tinyurl.com/j82ds7o

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NEW Leadership Oregon

NEW Leadership™ Oregon (NLO) is the award-winning women’s leadership development program housed at the Center for Women’s Leadership at Portland State University. Open to all women enrolled at any university/college in the state of Oregon, the six-day residential program educates and encourages outstanding college women to develop paths towards leadership.

NEW Leadership Oregon teaches leadership through action. Participants will:

  • Practice public speaking, planning, organizing, and networking to address real social problems.
  • Draw on the expertise of seasoned coaches and the experiences of women leaders in government, business, science, art and the community.
  • Visit the Oregon capitol and learn about the legislative process from state policymakers.
  • Learn a set of skills designed specifically to prepare college women for public leadership.

If you know of women who would be interested in participating in NLO, please encourage them to apply. Applications are due by February 3, 2016, and are available online here.

Undergraduate Research Symposium

For five years now, Undergraduate Studies has partnered with University Housing, the Robert D. Clark Honors College, UO Libraries, the Division of Equity and Inclusion, and the Office of Research and Innovation to support theUndergraduate Symposium—a special, campus-wide opportunity for students to present their original contributions in the sciences, social sciences, arts, and humanities. Abstract proposals for student presentations at the 2016 event are due by 11:59 pm on March 25 and are submitted via the Undergraduate Symposium website or this direct link.

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In This Issue:

Journal Club

Science Friday at UO

Flame Challenge

Teaching Workshops with Joan Middendorf

NEW Leadership Oregon

Undergraduate Research Symposium

Upcoming UO and Local Events


Upcoming UO and Local Events:

TEP Winter Workshops

This winter, TEP begins its High Impact Change series, which asks “How can faculty teach to ensure the relevance, rigor, continuities, and needed departures of a 21st century undergraduate education?”

Our first events and workshops are clustered around the notion of fostering students’ sense of belonging in our classes. We’ll foreground inclusive teaching designed to convey to students that their presence matters; and we’ll consider how to construct classes that can address questions of equity and belonging that are urgent to society more generally.

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Inclusive Course Design

Week 4: Fri, Jan. 29
11:30am-1:30pm
Proctor 41, Knight Library
Lunch served—please register

Using the syllabus itself as a reflection of the attitudes and possibilities of a course, this workshop will consider student learning objectives, course descriptions, policies, content, and assignments as we build inclusion into the very architecture of each participant’s course. We will consider what intellectual skills and habits of mind a truly inclusive course develops in students, and offer suggestions for how to build a supportive environment and signal to students that they bring something valuable to the class community.

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Implicit Bias in Decision-Making: An Introduction

Thursday, February 11th, noon -1:30 p.m.
Knight Library Browsing Room
Workshop conducted by Erik J. Girvan, J.D., Ph.D., UO School of Law

How can someone’s race, sex, age, or other characteristics influence how we see and treat them even when we are genuinely trying to be unbiased? What concrete steps can we take to help prevent this from happening? To help answer these questions, this workshop introduces the concept of implicit bias. Through a mix of short presentations, lively activities, and discussions, we will explore some harmful side effects of how our brains naturally perceive, categorize, and draw inferences about the world, including other people. We will also examine when this kind of bias is most likely to occur. And we will talk about what practical steps we can all take to try to reduce or eliminate it as well as what has been shown not to work.

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Implicit Bias in Decision-Making: Specific Applications

Tuesday, February 16th | Noon -1:30 p.m.
Knight Library Browsing Room
Workshop conducted by Erik J. Girvan, J.D., Ph.D., UO School of Law

Knowing about implicit biases is not enough to reduce it or keep it from impacting what we do. Building on the introduction to implicit bias, in this workshop participants will work with the presenters to identify specific policies and practices in their workplace that are most likely to be affected by implicit bias and brainstorm concrete changes that they can make to minimize those effects.

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541.346.8982
scilit@uoregon.edu
http://scilit.uoregon.edu/

UO Science Literacy Program
1210 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403