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OUR MISSION IS TO SUPPORT STUDENT SUCCESS THROUGH DEVELOPMENT OF EXCELLENT SCIENCE TEACHERS.
Journal Club

During Winter 2017, we will continue to have two journal clubs to choose from.

For Thursday’s 9am session, please read:
Jackson, MC, G Galvez, I Landa, P Buonora, and D B Thoman.  (2016). Science That Matters: The Importance of a Cultural Connection in Underrepresented Students’ Science Pursuit CBE Life Sci Educ 15:ar42 1-12. http://www.lifescied.org/content/15/3/ar42.full.pdf+html

For Friday’s 1pm session, please read:

pages 153-173 of Olson, R. (2015). Houston, we have a narrative: Why science needs a story. University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.
Both sessions will be held in LISB 217.  Hope to see you there.

Elly, Julie, and Phil

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Spring 2017 Scholars

We are now recruiting undergraduate SLP scholars. Applications are in the process of being reviewed. Here’s the link to the undergraduate application and the CAS 409 Practicum information.

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Oregon AAPT Meeting

The American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) is hosting a meeting on Saturday, March 11, 2017 at Oregon State University.  As always, there will be lively discussion, updates, and the chance to network with teachers and professors in high schools, colleges, and universities.  Physics educators will also have the chance to present papers on topics of special interest to teachers of physics and physical sciences in the state of Oregon.  Presentations are generally 15 minutes long.  Those wishing to submit papers should contact Ralph Taddy.

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2017 Summer Institutes on Scientific Teaching

Announcing the 2017 Summer Institutes on Scientific Teaching for STEM faculty and future faculty.  Come explore evidence-based models of instruction for the undergraduate classroom.  Accepted participants will learn practical strategies for enhancing student learning through the principles of scientific teaching: active learning, assessment and inclusive teaching. Participants will have opportunities to engage in interactive sessions, work in small groups with a trained facilitator, and present instructional materials for feedback and review.  Below is the information for this summer’s institutes.

June 5 – 10: Northstar (HHMI-funded)
University of Minnesota
Faculty & future faculty from research-intensive institutions

June 19 – 23: California (Helmsley-funded) 
University of California, San Diego
Faculty & future faculty from teaching-intensive institutions

June 20 – 23: Northwest (HHMI-funded) 
University of Oregon
Faculty & future faculty from research-intensive institutions

June 25 – 29: Northeast (Helmsley-funded) 
University of Connecticut
Faculty & future faculty from teaching-intensive institutions

July 17 – 21: Gulf Coast (Helmsley-funded) 
Louisiana State University
Faculty & future faculty from teaching-intensive institutions

July 24 – 28: Midwest (HHMI-funded) 
University of Chicago
Faculty & future faculty from research-intensive institutions

We encourage participants to apply to the Summer Institute that best matches their home institution type & geographic area, but welcome applications to an alternative site due to scheduling or travel constraints. Applications due throughout April 2017. See website for details.

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ComSciCon 2017 National Workshop

At ComSciCon’s National Workshop, graduate students build communication skills that scientists and other technical professionals need to express ideas to their peers, experts in other fields, and the general public.

This year, there will be panel discussions on the following topics:

  • Media and Journalism
  • Science Advocacy
  • Digital Storytelling
  • Diversity in Science Communication
  • Story Collider

In addition to these discussions, ample time is allocated for networking with science communication experts and developing science outreach collaborations with fellow graduate students. Workshop participants will produce an original piece of science writing and receive feedback from workshop attendees and professional science communicators, including journalists, authors, public policy advocates, educators, and more.  To apply and for more information, please visit the website.

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ASMCUE 2017

At the ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators (ASMCUE), you’ll take part in the important discussions that will shape the future of teaching and learning in the biological sciences. Join your peers at the 2017 meeting (July 27–30, 2017, Denver, CO) to participate in the formal and informal conversations that will enhance the work you do every day.  Registration is open now, and early bird registration ends onMay 15, 2017.  Please visit the website for more details.
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NWBIO 2017 Conference

NWBIO (Northwest Biology Instructor’s Organization) began in 1966 as a way to facilitate dialogue between faculty of Washington State community colleges, universities, and private four-year colleges, on pedagogical and scientific problems in the field of biology. Originally called WACBT (Washington Association of College Biology Teachers), NWBIO now includes additional faculty from British Columbia, Oregon, and Northern Idaho.  This year’s conference will be held on May 5-7 on the University of Washington Tacoma campus. To register and for more information, please visit the website.

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STEM For All Video Showcase

You are invited to be a presenter and to showcase your NSF and other federally-funded project work that is aimed at improving STEM teaching and learning. This year’s theme is Research & Design for Impact. Create and share a 3-minute video that describes the need that inspired your project, your intervention, and your project’s impact to date. During the week of May 15th – 22nd, 2017 you will engage in rich discussions about your project and those of your colleagues with researchers, practitioners, policy makers, and members of the public. This is a fabulous opportunity to disseminate your work as the showcase attracts tens of thousands of participants internationally.  To register and for more information, please visit the website.

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In This Issue:

Journal Club
Spring 2017 Scholars
Oregon AAPT Meeting
2017 Summer Institutes on Scientific Teaching
ComSciCon 2017 National Workshop
ASMCUE 2017
NWBIO 2017 Conference
STEM For All Video Showcase
Upcoming UO and Local Events

Upcoming UO and Local Events:
Distinguished Math Lectures for Students

As part of the Distinguished Mathematics Lectures for Students series, Elisabeta Marai, from the University of Illinois at Chicago’s Electronic Visualization Lab, will visit and give a broadly accessible talk, “Computer Graphics for Science,” at 5:15 pm on Wednesday, February 22, in Willamette 100.  This is part of the Mathematics Department’s Distinguished Lectures for Students series.  All are welcome, and undergraduates are especially encouraged to attend.

Computer graphics is sometimes defined as “mathematics made visible.”  What can computer graphics do for science? This talk will discuss an array of projects that Dr. Marai and her student group have developed at the Electronic Visualization Lab at the University of Illinois . These projects build on solid mathematical foundations to facilitate the analysis of complex scientific phenomena. The resulting representations and tools have application in domains as diverse as neuroimaging, biology, astronomy, and orthopaedics.

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Reclaiming Critical Thinking: Cultivating Capacity for the Conversations that Matter

Week 7: Tue, Feb 21
8:30-10:30am
Knight Library Browsing Room
Breakfast will be served, formal program begins at 9am
RSVP here

How can we think constructively, across differences, about the things that matter?

In this session, Professor Magee urges us to add an interpersonal dimension to “critical thinking” and how we teach it. Come connect over a light breakfast, then enliven our sense of what surveys of U.S. faculty reveal as our single most deeply held goal for our students—that they be “critical thinkers.” What does this goal really mean, and can we accomplish it more compellingly in a time when critical thinking seems to be urgently needed?

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Undergraduate Research Symposium 

Undergraduate students have the opportunity to present their research at the 6th annual Undergraduate Research Symposium on May 18th, 2016.  The deadline for abstract submissions is March 10th.  This is a terrific opportunity for students to compile and share their results with their peers, other researchers, and non-scientists.  The Department of Biology is offering one $300 award to the student with the best poster, and two $100 awards for posters with honorable mention.  Judging will be performed by senior graduate students.

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Teaching Social Science and Humanities as Portable Skills: Can a New Take on ‘Research Methods’ Revive Enrollments?

Week 7: Fri, Feb. 24
11:00am-1:00pm
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art Papé Reception Hall
Lunch will be served, courtesy of the Tom and Carol Williams Fund

Methods courses are often pitched toward undergraduate majors as preparation for sophisticated work that replicates the processes and conventions of scholarship in a discipline—in other words, these courses prepare students for advanced papers and projects that will cap their UO careers and perhaps transition them into graduate work. But are we under-imagining their capacity to attract students to our disciplines and broad subject areas (say, humanities or social sciences)? Do the skills of our work actually transfer well to public and professional contexts, and can we foreground the way student-led discovery and application of skills across contexts make methods courses some of the most exciting that students take?

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Teaching Social Science and Humanities as Portable Skills: Can a New Take on ‘Research Methods’ Revive Enrollments?

Week 7: Fri, Feb. 24
11:00am-1:00pm
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art Papé Reception Hall
Lunch will be served, courtesy of the Tom and Carol Williams Fund

Methods courses are often pitched toward undergraduate majors as preparation for sophisticated work that replicates the processes and conventions of scholarship in a discipline—in other words, these courses prepare students for advanced papers and projects that will cap their UO careers and perhaps transition them into graduate work. But are we under-imagining their capacity to attract students to our disciplines and broad subject areas (say, humanities or social sciences)? Do the skills of our work actually transfer well to public and professional contexts, and can we foreground the way student-led discovery and application of skills across contexts make methods courses some of the most exciting that students take?

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UO Science and Invention Fair

The 2017 UO Science and Invention Fair is a chance for children of all ages to develop an enthusiasm for science by designing and carrying out their own experiment.  Project entry is open to all Lane County children in grades K-8. This fair is open to all members of the public and family friendly. Even if you are not entering a project, come and have fun learning new things!   For more information, please visit the website.

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541.346.8982                                                                                             UO Science Literacy Program
scilit@uoregon.edu                                                                                             1210 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403