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OUR MISSION IS TO SUPPORT STUDENT SUCCESS THROUGH DEVELOPMENT OF EXCELLENT SCIENCE TEACHERS.
Journal Club

During Winter 2017, we will continue to have two journal clubs to choose from.

For Thursday’s 9am session, please read:
Delparte, D. M., Richardson, R., Eitel, K., Matsaw, S., & Cohn, T. (2016). Promoting Geoscience STEM Interest in Native American Students: GIS, Geovisualization and Reconceptualizing Spatial Thinking Skills. International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, 15(5). http://www.ijlter.org/index.php/ijlter/article/view/622

For Friday’s 1pm session, please read:

pages 185-212: Chapter 12 of Olson, R. (2015). Houston, we have a narrative: Why science needs a story. University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.
Both sessions will be held in LISB 217.  Hope to see you there.

Elly, Julie, and Phil

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2017 Northwest Regional Summer Institute on Scientific Teaching

Applications are now open for the Northwest Regional Summer Institute on Scientific Teaching!  This institute will be held at the University of Oregon June 20-23, 2017 specifically targeted to faculty and postdoctoral fellows from research intensive universities. The Summer Institute will expand and sharpen participants’ teaching skills through workshops facilitated by national science education experts.  Participants will develop original, innovative classroom materials ready for immediate implementation and will be named 2017-18 Scientific Teaching Education Fellows at the end of the institute.  The deadline to apply to the institute is April 10, 2017.

Participants are also invited to apply to attend other regional Summer Institutes, which will be held throughout the summer at University of Minnesota, University of California at San Diego, University of Connecticut, Louisiana State University, and University of Chicago.

More information is available on the Summer Institutes webpage: http://www.summerinstitutes.org/
Questions or to nominate a colleague: ellyvan@uoregon.edu

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Undergraduate Research Symposium 2017

The deadline for submitting abstract proposals to the UO Undergraduate Research Symposium is  is Friday, March 10 at 11:59pm via the symposium website.  Please save the date so you can attend and help celebrate the extraordinary creativity and ingenuity of our students.  The symposium defines research expansively and welcomes all forms of undergraduate creative work from the sciences, social sciences, arts, humanities, professional schools, study abroad, service learning, and community-engaged projects. This year we are excited to return to a renovated EMU with fabulous spaces that will enable us to accommodate an unprecedented variety of performances and art installations in complement to poster sessions and presentation panels. The symposium has grown each year and the 2016 event included over 200 presenters, representing 57 majors and seven colleges.The 2017 event will take place on Thursday, May 18 and will conclude with a reception and awards ceremony from 5-7 pm. The reception offers a great opportunity to mingle, listen to live music, and interact with student presenters.

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In This Issue:

Journal Club
2017 Northwest Regional Summer Institute on Scientific Teaching
Undergraduate Research Symposium 2017
Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Corner
Upcoming UO and Local Events

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Corner
As part of the new UO Teaching Academy, we are launching a weekly feature in the SLP newsletter highlighting Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) practices.  These will appear in both the SLP and TEP newsletters.  Please feel free to let us know if there are resources or publications you would like to see shared here.
Week 9 Spotlight:

Students who participate actively in their classes retain material better than those who passively listen to lectures. This definitive 2014 meta-analysis by researchers at the University of Washington shows that students in active learning classes do on average 6 percentage points better on exams than their counterparts in lecture-based classes, and that students in classes with traditional lecturing are 1.5 times more likely to fail than students in classes with active learning.  See the following article for more information:

Freeman, S., Eddy, S. L., McDonough, M., Smith, M. K., Okoroafor, N., Jordt, H., & Wenderoth, M. P. (2014). Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences111(23), 8410-8415. http://www.pnas.org/content/111/23/8410.short

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